The essential gift of patience  for a missionary disciple

The essential gift of patience for a missionary disciple

March 2021, Missionary Discipleship
By Katie Eskro In the June 2020 issue of the Bishop’s Bulletin, Father Scott Traynor describes missionary discipleship as “encountering the love of Jesus Christ, growing in relationship with him, and inviting and helping others to do the same.” I love this definition. The first thing that strikes me about this description is that the first two steps have to do with us: are we aware of the encounter of Jesus in the events of our everyday lives, and are we growing closer to him and his Church through these ordinary, everyday events? The last part of the definition, to invite and help others, can only flow from what we’ve received. Indeed, if we are to live the Christian life of community in its full, we are not just sharing…
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Helping others grow in relationship  with God, one small group at a time

Helping others grow in relationship with God, one small group at a time

February 2021, Missionary Discipleship
By Wendy Royston At the Lord’s nudging, Bishop Donald DeGrood has laid out a vision for a diocesan-wide call to, essentially, embody the true meaning of Catholicism. “Missionary discipleship is following Jesus and sharing Him with those around you,” explained Dr. Chris Burgwald, director of Adult Discipleship and Evangelization. “To be Catholic has always meant to have a relationship with God, and then do what I can to help others to have a relationship with God. … This is kind of putting a specific name to what our Catholic faith has always been about.” In his first year as the shepherd of the Sioux Falls diocese, Bishop DeGrood has sensed a need for renewed emphasis on what he has themed Lifelong Catholic Missionary Discipleship Through God’s Love. As it is…
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Bishop’s initiative provides insight on challenging culture

Bishop’s initiative provides insight on challenging culture

January 2021, Missionary Discipleship
By Renae Kranz The first generations of Christians, led by the Apostles, faced an enormous challenge after Pentecost: convert to Christianity a world hostile to the good news of Christ’s resurrection and the gift of salvation. They faced great persecution and even death, but their work and the perseverance of many generations after them built a Christian culture that has survived for centuries. This was a culture built on the foundations of Christian faith and Catholic institutions that made practicing faith a natural part of life. That Christian culture, known as Christendom, is now gone. In the early ’70s, Archbishop Fulton Sheen said of the state of Christianity, “We are at the end of Christendom. Not of Christianity, not of the Church, but of Christendom. Now what is meant by…
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